jump to navigation

Pakistan blasphemy legislation petition August 26, 2009

Posted by Andrew in Justice.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

I often get asked whether Christian-Mulsim dialogue is a worthwhile activity. People want to know whether it actually achieves anything, do we tackle difficlut issues or just sit round having a nice time.

Well I hope the following link gives some indication of the fruits of our labours. It’s a petition to the Pakistani governement asking for the repeal of the Blasphemy laws in that country. These laws have been used by some Muslims to legitimise attacks on christians and this happened in a particularly viscious way recently.

This petition has been written by a Muslim and a Christian and has come about in part due to the discussions we’ve had at dialgue events where we’ve been able to highlight the plight of Christians in Pakistan in a way that doesn’t blame the Muslims here but enables them to see the injustice of what’s happening.

Do take a look, sign it if you can, and if you’re unsure about the value of dialogue I hope this inspires you to see its worth and get involved.

Pakistan blasphemy legislation petition

Shared via AddThis

More to Learn August 14, 2009

Posted by Andrew in Youth Work.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

The other day I spent some time with the Faiths Act Fellows . This is a group of 30 young leaders spending a year with The Tony Blair Faith Foundation. They came from the UK, the USA and Canada and included Christians, Muslims, Jews, Sikhs, Athiests and Bhuddists. Whilst I was providing some training for them on dialogue with young people it also gave me some great insights into the diversity one encounters when working on a wider scale. They raised issues of concern to their communities and in their situations. Some of the guys from the States and Canada brought up concerns that I haven’t encountered here in the UK.

I have to say that they were a group of enthusiastic, passionate young people committed to doing something towards building peace and understanding. And in doing so taught me, once again, that however much I might think I know there’s always plenty more to learn.